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Principles of Nematode Management
in the Southern U.S.



By Dr. John Mueller, et al.
Extension Plant Pathologist
Clemson University
Phone:
803-284-3343 ext 223
Email:JMLLR@clemson.edu

Part 1: Species Host Range and Biology
by John Mueller, Ph.D.

Watch Presentation (15 min 28 sec)

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Part 2: Nematode Sampling and Thresholds
by Steve Koenning, Ph.D.

Watch Presentation (18 min 44 sec)

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Part 3: Resistant Cultivars and Crop Rotation
by Scott Monfort, Ph.D.

Watch Presentation (18 min 49 sec)

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Part 4: Using Nematicides
by Terry Kirkpatrick, Ph.D.

Watch Presentation (22 min 54 sec)

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Summary:

This presentation will help consultants, growers, and other practitioners in the Southern U.S. scout and manage the major nematode species on soybeans and other row crops. Nematode problems are widespread in the Southern United States and annually cause 5-10% yield losses for the total crop. In these four presentations we will cover: the biology and life cycle of SCN; symptoms caused by nematodes, how to use sample a field and how to interpret your results using damage thresholds; using resistant cultivars and crop rotations; and using combinations of nematicides and resistant cultivars. By the end of this presentation, the practitioner should know more about the life lifecycle of Southern root-knot, reniform, soybean cyst and Columbia lance nematodes and be able to design an appropriate scouting and management program.


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