Back to Focus on Potato


Internal Heat Necrosis of Potato

April 2012




By Dr. Craig Yencho
Professor in the Department of Horticultural Science
North Carolina State University
Raleigh, North Carolina
Phone: 919-513-7417
Email: Craig_Yencho@NCSU.edu


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Summary:

This presentation is on internal heat necrosis of potato. Internal heat necrosis (IHN) is a non-pathogenic physiological disorder of potato tubers. It was originally described in the early 1900ís and has also been called internal brown spot, physiological internal necrosis, internal browning, internal brown fleck, and chocolate spot. Potatoes with IHN have light brown to reddish brown necrotic patches in the parenchyma (flesh) of the tuber. There are no aboveground symptoms and no external symptoms on the tubers. IHN is generally a significant problem in the mid-Atlantic and southeastern US, but it can also a problem in other regions of the country when high temperatures and drought prevail. In this talk, Dr. Craig Yencho from NC State University will cover various aspects of IHN including symptoms and control, when a crop is at risk of developing IHN, models to predict the occurrence of IHN, varietal resistance to IHN, and current research efforts to develop IHN resistant potato varieties.


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