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35

Susceptibility of edible leguminous hosts to Phakopsora pachyrhizi under field conditions in central Florida

Presenter: C. L. Harmon

All authors and affiliations: C. L. HARMON (1), J. J. Marois (2), D. L. Wright (3), and P. F. Harmon (4). (1) Southern Plant Diag. Network and Department of Plant Pathology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL; (2) Department of Plant Pathology, N. Florida Research and Educ. Center, University of Florida, Quincy, FL; (3) Department of Agronomy, N. Florida Research and Educ. Center, University of Florida, Quincy, FL; and (4) Department of Plant Pathology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL

Asian soybean rust affects a large number of hosts. In addition to soybean (Glycine max), Phakopsora pachyrhizi has been shown to infect an additional 60 species in 26 other genera in controlled environment inoculations. A number of these host plants are cultivated in the United States. In addition to G. max, host species include Pachyrhizus erosus (yam bean, jicama), Phaseolus lunatus (butter bean, lima bean), and Vigna unguiculata (cowpea, black-eyed pea). In 2005, Asian soybean rust was reported on three Phaseolus spp. grown in Quincy, FL. Rust was detected in early December just before first frost, when plants were at physiological maturity. Growers of edible legumes are concerned by the lack of data on field susceptibility and potential economic impact to these commercially grown vegetable bean hosts. Defining susceptibilities of species and cultivars of dry and edible beans allows producers and consultants to better plan scouting and management efforts that will be employed as Asian soybean rust spreads into production areas each year. Five plantings of more than 15 varieties of edible beans were monitored for the development of soybean rust over two seasons. Plantings established at different times during the year were in close proximity to soybean plots infected with P. pachyrhizi. Disease developed from natural inoculum in 2005 plantings and from spreader rows of soybeans were inoculated with the pathogen in 2006 plantings. Soybean cultivars within the trial were the only beans that became infected with Asian soybean rust. These data suggest that, under central Florida conditions, risks posed by Asian soybean rust to edible legumes other than soybean are minimal.

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