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Table 2 from:


Grove, G. G., Lunden, J., and Spayd, S. 2005. Use of petroleum derived spray oils in Washington grapevine powdery mildew management programs. Online. Plant Health Progress doi:10.1094/PHP-2005-0317-01-RS.


Table 2. Effect of postinfective fungicide applications on severity of foliar and fruit powdery mildew on ‘Lemberger’ grapevines.

Year Treatment Timing
of initial
appli-
cation
a,b
Initial
appli-
cation
Disease
severity:
foliage
c
Disease
severity:

fruitd
Total
appli-
cations
Powdery
mildew
manage-
ment

(costs
per ha)e
2001 Untreated -- -- 54.8 c 0.0 -- --
PDSO, then
micronized
sulfur
Initial signs,
then 7-day
intervalsa
12 July
(pea-sized
berries)
11.4 ab 0.0 5 $927.80
PDSO, then
triflumizole
Initial signs,
then 14-day
intervals to
veraison
12 July 12.0 ab 0.0 2 $446.00
Micronized
sulfur, then+
triflumizole/
trifloxystrobin
alternation
Industry
standardb
17 May 9.7 ab 0.0 7 $1488.78
2002 Untreated -- -- 48.0 b 22.8 b -- --
PDSO, then
micronized
sulfur
Initial signs,
then 7-day
intervals to
veraison
16 June
(late bloom)
0.0 a 0.0 a 7 $1270.26
PDSO, then
fenarimol/
trifloxystrobin
alternation
Initial signs,
then 14-day
intervals to
veraison
16 June 0.0 a 0.0 a 5 $1045.53
Fenarimol/
azoxystrobin
alternation
Industry
standard
23 May 0.0 a 0.0 a 7 $1451.82
Micronized
sulfur, then
fenarimol/
trifloxystrobin/
alternation
Industry
standard
23 May 0.0 a 0.0 a 7 $1400.85

 a Fungicide program initiated when first signs of foliar powdery mildew were observed.

 b Fungicide program initiated at 15-30 cm shoot stage, then every 14 days until veraison.

 c Percent leaf area affected by powdery mildew.

 d  Percent cluster area affected by powdery mildew.

 e Includes chemical and application (labor, equipment, fuel, maintenance, and depreciation) costs.



© 2005 Plant Management Network.